AIRPORT ETIQUETTE

Are you flying the friendly skies?

AAA World Article

IT ALL BEGINS WITH GETTING THROUGH TSA

At the airport, have your boarding pass and ID ready. Don’t wear items that are difficult to take off and put back on—like belts and strappy shoes. If you have a laptop, travel with an easy-access travel case. Briefcases and backpacks do not need to go in a plastic bin; save bins for smaller items to keep traffic flowing through the security line.

BATHROOM RULES

If you make frequent bathroom visits, try to book an aisle seat. Pay attention to your surroundings when getting up for a bathroom break. If the flight attendants are in the aisle with a cart or cleaning up from dinner service—now is not the time to go. Remember, you’re sharing this lavatory with 150+ fellow passengers, keep it quick and don’t make a mess.

TAKE YOUR SEAT

When standing, use your own seat’s armrests to stand up and don’t grab the seat in front of you so you don’t jerk someone’s head back. And because middle seats are so undesirable, give your middle seatmate the armrests. If you’re seated at the window or aisle, you can use the one that’s dedicated to you.

RECLINE WITH CARE

We’ve all been on flights where what space we did have is invaded by the slow inevitable recline of the seat in front of you. Be mindful of the person behind you—don’t recline if you don’t have to and one should always remain upright during food service. May we suggest warning the person behind you, so that they can hold onto their drinks or adjust their work station.

WHAT’S THAT SMELL?

Consider your odor—go easy on the perfume or cologne, as many people are allergic. Watch what you eat too…when grabbing food before your flight, grab something that doesn’t have a distinct or strong odor.

KIDS WILL BE KIDS

Both parents and fellow travelers should exercise patience with children, but parents should keep kids occupied with books, small games, or electronics with headphones. Parents should be aware of their children at all times and make sure little legs aren’t kicking the seat in front of them so people aren’t jostled the entire flight.

ALWAYS BE COURTEOUS

Polite and patient people tend to accomplish more and create more goodwill while traveling. Be aware that most travelers are in a hurry, and tempers often fray as a result. If you encounter any hiccups during your trip—such as a flight cancellation or issues with reservations—you’ll get help easier and more quickly by being courteous.